Maui Windows and Doors Hosts Grand Opening

Written on January 21, 2015 at 13:46

Maui Windows and Doors celebrated the grand opening of its brand new showroom and retail store with a two-day open house held January 16 and 17. The 3,000-square-foot showroom is home to the lone specialty windows and doors supply company on the island. Representatives from window and door manufacturers Panda and Hurd were present at the event to share product information. 

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Article source: http://windowanddoor.com/news-item/companies/maui-windows-and-doors-hosts-grand-opening

Sound View Window & Door
2626 15th Ave W SeattleWA98119 USA 
 • 206-402-4229

Anlin Names BM Top Performer

Written on January 21, 2015 at 01:41

BM Windows was named “Top Performer” by window manufacturer Anlin Window Systems. The award, the second for BM Windows in as many years, recognizes the replacement window and door installer’s “dedication in the product sales, marketing and education of Anlin Window Systems products.”

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Article source: http://windowanddoor.com/news-item/companies/anlin-names-bm-top-performer

Quanex Appoints Lunde to Territory Sales Manager

Written on January 21, 2015 at 01:41

Quanex Building Products appointed Lance Lunde to territory sales manager in its South-Central region. Lunde has more than 10 years of fenestration sales experience, including five years with Quanex brands. He most recently served Quanex customers in the Southwest territory and will be based in the Dallas-Fort Worth area.

“Lance is extremely knowledgeable about our products and industry, and brings a proven dedication to providing exceptional customer service to his new territory,” says George Wilson, general manager of Quanex’s insulating glass spacer operations. “In his new role, he’ll be responsible for continuing to build strong relationships and prospecting new customers in the region for all Quanex product lines.” 

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Article source: http://windowanddoor.com/news-item/people/quanex-appoints-lunde-territory-sales-manager

2015 Codes to Require Storm Shelters

Written on January 21, 2015 at 01:41

Note: While the content of this installation of Code Arena may seem of more interest to the commercial side of the industry, the information is pertinent to those supplying the residential market in that the requirement is for an Emergency Escape and Rescue Opening in shelters that are only required to have one door. Typically, this would be provided by a residential window manufacturer that wishes to pursue the opportunity in this new market.

How would you react if you were asked to provide an emergency escape and rescue window that is impact resistant and can withstand 250 mph design wind speeds for a school in Oklahoma? Would you be surprised to receive such a request? With the advent of the 2015 International Codes this year, such a request might come up.

The 2015 International Building Code (IBC) requires storm shelters that comply with ICC 500 Standard for the Design and Construction of Storm Shelters in schools housing kindergarten through high school students with more than 50 occupants and in critical emergency operation centers in tornado-prone areas. Critical emergency operation centers include 911 call centers, fire, police, ambulance and rescue stations, and other occupancies specifically intended to maintain essential functions and provide first responders with a necessary base of operations during emergency situations. Tornado-prone areas include all of Iowa, Missouri, Arkansas, Illinois, Indiana and Ohio, and parts of Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, New York, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, Mississippi, Alabama and Louisiana that border these core states.
 
The shelters are to be sized to accommodate the occupant load of the building it serves. They may be incorporated into another building or be constructed as stand-alone buildings. In either case, they must meet the requirements of the applicable building code (2015 IBC) as well as ICC 500. The 2015 IBC will require exit doors in the envelope of the storm shelter, with the number required to be determined by the designated occupant load of the shelter.

If only one exit door is required, an emergency escape and rescue opening will also be required by ICC 500. The storm shelters must also be provided with a minimum level of natural or mechanical ventilation. Natural ventilation can be provided by doors, operable windows or operable skylights that are within a certain distance from the floor of the shelter.
 
The emergency escape and rescue opening must meet the criteria of the 2015 IBC with regard to size and operability. This means it must provide an opening that is a minimum of 5.7 square feet in area, with a minimum width of 20 inches and a minimum height of 24 inches, and it must be operable without the use of tools or special knowledge.

All of the fenestration in the envelope of the storm shelter, whether windows, doors or skylights, will be required to meet the structural criteria of ICC 500. This will mean they must be designed to resist a 250 mph design wind speed, and have been tested for impact resistance and cyclical pressure in accordance with ASTM E1886/E1996. For the sake of comparison, the design wind speed given in the 2015 IBC for schools in Miami, Florida is 200 mph.

If a manufacturer offers a line of impact-resistant products for use in these applications, ICC 500 will require that both the smallest and largest size offered in that product line be tested in order to qualify for installation. Under the 2015 IBC, only the largest size is required to be tested. So the criterion of ICC 500 for fenestration in storm shelters is more stringent than that of the 2015 IBC for occupancies of similar risk category in hurricane prone areas.

Although the 2015 edition of the International Codes is now available, a lag inherently occurs between the publication of the newest edition and its enforcement. Typically, enforcement of a new code does not begin until about a year after it has been published. Adoption and enforcement of the International Codes, however, is fairly well entrenched in the United States at this point. So while you may not encounter such a request within the next year or so, it is quite likely your company will encounter a request of this or similar nature, at some point in the next two to three years.

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Code Arena is brought to you by the America Architectural Manufacturers Association. Julie Ruth may be reached through AAMA at 847/303-5664 or via e-mail at julruth@aol.com.

Article source: http://windowanddoor.com/article/januaryfebruary-2015/code-arena-storm-shelters

Mobile Is the Future—and the Present

Written on January 20, 2015 at 13:41

“Mobile” is a word everyone knows, but it has a specific meaning regarding online marketing. But what exactly does mobile mean in this context and how can you optimize your website for mobile devices?

Responsive Design
Mobile refers to the way potential customers are receiving information online via mobile devices, such as smartphones and tablets. Not only did sales for this category go through the roof in 2014, but Google predicts that mobile searches will overtake desktop-based searches (84 billion) sometime in 2015.

This means that if your website is not optimized for mobile, you’re missing out on a huge segment of potential customers. This is especially true in the window and door industry, as the potential customer- base closely matches the demographics of those who own smartphones and tablets and use them daily.

When a website is optimized for mobile, it is just as user-friendly when viewed on a mobile device as it is when seen on a desktop or laptop computer. We call this responsive design.

Responsive design isn’t something that will be critical in the future—it’s critical right now. Your site must load quickly and be easy to navigate on mobile devices. If it doesn’t, a mobile visitor will immediately “bounce” from your site and check out one of your competitors.

Mobile Marketing
The other aspect of mobile is mobile marketing, which is a massive subject, but, in general, refers to a variety of marketing techniques specific to mobile devices.

These techniques include text messages that target the phones of likely customers, location-based marketing that specifically targets people in particular areas, and mobile ads specifically designed to appeal to mobile users.

Mobile marketing makes it easy to target leads based on demographics such as location, age and income, which makes it a great tool for window and door businesses. It’s a good idea to start employing this tool for your business. At the very least, it’s imperative that you ensure your website is optimized for mobile right now.

How far along are you in the process of mobile marketing? How is it working for your company? Take this week’s poll, post a comment and/or email me with your thoughts.

Does your company incorporate mobile technologies to attract customers?

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Welton Hong is the founder and Internet marketing director of Ring Ring Marketing, a marketing firm that specializes in window and door businesses, and author of the book Making Your Phone Ring with Internet Marketing for Windows Doors Companies, available through Amazon.com. Contact him at welton@ringringmarketing.com or 888/383-2848.

 

Article source: http://windowanddoor.com/article/sales-marketing/mobile-future%E2%80%94and-present

Call for Product Submissions

Written on January 15, 2015 at 13:28

We’re planning to publish a special product focus on hardware in the March/April issue of Window Door. Submit your products for consideration. 

 

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Article source: http://windowanddoor.com/article/call-product-submissions

Ordering Liability

Written on January 14, 2015 at 13:27

A few years ago, I was contracted by a dealer to perform the take-off of full-frame replacement windows for a very old home. This was my only role for this job. A general contractor would hire out the installation to a crew with window replacement skill-level unknown to me.

Most of the existing windows were double-hung wood, old-generation weight and pulley, with very robust exterior casing and with many layers of paint, so none would open. Some of the window combinations were site-built, based on the inconsistencies in spread-mulls and subsills.

The bay combinations varied in complexity, plus the home had an unusual mix of wall thicknesses, and there were plenty of various interior shutters, all of which the homeowner wanted to reuse after the windows were replaced. There wasn’t much consistency to rely on, so I had to number each opening rather than just specify eight of these, five of these, etc.

The existing window frame and casing profiles were quite common for that decade, but the new generation full-frame replacement products (also wood) were quite different proportionally. The weight pockets had to be removed and the rough openings narrowed to accommodate a conventional balance and frame system. Plus, other particulars had to be considered, such as the exterior projection of the new casing to span the unusually wide cavity between the wall sheathing and back of the brick.

With approximately 60 openings, the take-off would take days, not hours, and a lot of careful work to adapt or, really, design the new products to the openings. I like a challenge, but have to admit, this take-off was wearing and even stressful.

Approaching $75,000 in product alone, there was a lot at stake for accuracy. I was confident in my take-off but if, somehow, I made an ordering error, would I be liable for the cost of any windows should they not fit?

The answer to the question is not the point of this story. The point of the story is that this question was answered before I invested time in the take-off and especially before I placed the order. Do you take similar measures? Read my latest column that expands on the topic, take this week’s poll, post a comment, and/or email me to share your story. 

Whatever your role in the ordering/take-off or payment process, is it made clear up-front which party will take on the financial liability of the order?

 

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Jim Snyder is an AAMA-certified FenestrationMaster and InstallationMaster who shares his years of installation field experience as an industry writer, speaker, trainer and project/product consultant for dealers and manufacturers. A member of various industry organizations, Snyder also is involved in instructional document creation and revision. Contact him at jim@windowjim.com.

Article source: http://windowanddoor.com/article/operations/ordering-liability-0

Pella Unveils Smart Home Technology at CES

Written on January 14, 2015 at 01:27

Pella unveiled its newest innovation, Insynctive technology, a family of smart products for windows and doors, at the International Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas. The new motorized blinds and shades snap in and out and are powered by rechargeable batteries that are charged by a solar panel on the exterior.

The integrated system of sensors and motorized blinds and shades can be controlled using the status indicator or remote control, or by integrating with a compatible home automation system. Pella currently has partnerships with Wink, Nexia Home Intelligence, Crestron and Savant—with additional partnerships coming in 2015.

The Designer Series windows and doors with snap-in between-the-glass blinds and shades with Insynctive technology were named a 2015 CES Innovation Awards Honoree in the SmartHome product category. Additionally, Insynctive smart home technology was recently selected as a Better Homes Garden’s CES Editor’s Choice.

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Article source: http://windowanddoor.com/news-item/companies/pella-unveils-smart-home-technology-ces

Roto North America Hires Marketing Communications Specialist

Written on January 14, 2015 at 01:27

Roto North America announced that Jon D’Arpino has joined the team in the role of marketing communications specialist, a new position in which he will be responsible for the marketing efforts of Roto Frank of America and Roto Fasco Canada.

D’Arpino brings more than 15 years of experience as a marketing and communications professional to Roto North America. He will report directly to Chris Dimou, president and CEO for Roto North and Central America.
 

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Article source: http://windowanddoor.com/news-item/people/roto-north-america-hires-marketing-communications-specialist

Ordering Liability: Identifying Ownership

Written on January 14, 2015 at 01:27

I vividly remember a specific encounter years ago when I stepped into a fenestration dealer’s sales office to order some full-frame window units for a replacement job. The units were round-top mulled combinations, so they required more attention than normal for proper sizing. The salesperson and I were only acquaintances. However, I was purchasing from him because he had referred this client to me, for which I was appreciative.

Take-off notes in hand, I began to provide dimensions, radius, and so on. The salesperson’s response was, “Just give me your rough opening,” as he typed away at his keyboard. I did, and then tried again to feed him more sizing information (that I knew was relevant), but it seemed unimportant to him. He typically did new construction take-offs from plans, and didn’t appreciate the intricacies of replacement. This made me a bit uneasy especially because these were pricey windows. After a little more dialogue he wrapped it up with these exact words:  “Don’t worry, if they don’t fit, we’ll just reorder them.”

Really? Since most fenestration nowadays is made-to-order, it’s rarely returnable, much less refundable. Was he even considering that? I was. Ultimately, I made other arrangements.

Of the many fenestration orders placed every day, most are accurate. Some, unknowingly, are not. When they are not, the result is frustration, a delay in installation, a disappointed client, and probably the worst consequence—the cost of useless goods.

Performing a take-off and placing an order comes with risk. Because of that, those involved have a responsibility to order correctly. There is also liability with each order. The responsibility and liability are not always owned by the same source. Bottom line (pun intended):  Who will pay for the incorrect order?

Liability arrangements
As an independent installer who was contracted regularly by an installing replacement dealer for many, many years, our liability arrangement was spelled out clearly. I insisted on performing the final take-off for measurements and if a sizing error was made, I ponied up for the incorrect unit(s). This arrangement was part of the installation-pricing package. If, however, this dealer made an error on an option like the lite pattern, the liability was theirs.

With skin in the game, this prompted careful attention. Neither wanted either to make a mistake. Over the years, we became very efficient, double-checking each other, and made very few errors.

If I had been employed by this same dealer as an installer, I likely would not have been liable as part of a typical employee/employer relationship, though there may have been other consequences built into commissions to encourage accuracy.

Experienced professionals in our field know error is a real possibility with every order placed. It bothers me when someone with inexperience discredits the skill and value of an accurate take-off, such as with my dealer acquaintance. Ironically, if asked, “Will you also assume liability if this is incorrect?” the person’s interest in the details changes instantly.

I have witnessed professional contractor-dealer-client relationships where this liability is not spelled out, to the point where even the homeowner could become liable (by default) for errors made by someone else. This tends to happen more when a relationship is not well established between an installer, dealer and/or client.

The lesson here is, unless it is perfectly clear who is liable, the liability owner must be identified before placing the order. An “error” can also sometimes be subjective, so even when you’re sure the take-off is “correct” the ownership of the liability is still critical.

Consider the task of identifying liability ownership like an insurance policy–you need to have it, but hope you never have to use it. It can make things a little easier when an error does occur, and you can’t buy it after a wreck has already happened.

Who’s to Blame?

Consider the following examples where the take-off liability was sketchy.

  • A homeowner hired a turnkey independent contractor who provided product and installation. Having to purchase product from a dealer, the contractor opted to have the dealer do the take-off. When the new product arrived, the resulting product sizing was not what the contractor envisioned, resulting in a dilemma between the contractor and dealer.
  • A homeowner hired an independent contractor to install product that the homeowner planned to purchase directly from a dealer. The homeowner performed the take-off based on guidelines by the dealer. Once onsite, the contractor claimed the product wouldn’t fit based on his installation technique. A dilemma resulted between the homeowner and dealer, and, to a degree, even with the contractor.
  • A homeowner hired a turnkey contractor. The original all-wood products were to be replaced with full-frame pultruded frame material products, which typically result in adaptations and/or a revised trim out. Seeing these adaptations during the installation process, the homeowner was convinced they wouldn’t have been necessary if the new product was ordered “correctly.” While not a take-off error, it was a trust issue, and one that could be avoided by simply explaining to the homeowner the normal adaptations for this type of replacement. In this case, the contractor was able to help the homeowner understand—good thing, considering a large order of windows was at stake. If the homeowner couldn’t have been convinced, there would have been an order of windows with nowhere to go. And someone would have to pay for them.

 

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Jim Snyder is an AAMA-certified FenestrationMaster and InstallationMaster who shares his years of installation field experience as an industry writer, speaker, trainer and project/product consultant for dealers and manufacturers. A member of various industry organizations, Snyder also is involved in instructional document creation and revision. Contact him at jim@windowjim.com.

Article source: http://windowanddoor.com/article/januaryfebruary-2015/ordering-liability-identifying-ownership

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