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B. F. Rich Expands

Written on October 21, 2014 at 23:35

B.F. Rich Windows Doors expands into several new markets; the company’s products are now available in Ohio through NCRS in Hilliard, Columbus and Dayton. Tennessee now has six new locations through Best Distributing and, in Bluefield, West Virginia, Best Distributing also carries B.F. Rich’s energy efficient windows and patio doors.

B.F. Rich also hired several new employees. Joe Pearl joined the company as operations manager, where he will oversee customer service, purchasing, logistics, and various operational functions. Additionally, Kirstin Becker joined the Architectural Commercial Division as architectural specialist. With a degree in Architectural Engineering and Construction Management, she will be responsible for CAD drawings, take offs, bid packages, and proposals.

Chris Ohles was promoted to Quality Control Engineer. His background includes sales management and industrial engineering roles with Frito Lay Corporation. And, Jennifer Morris also joined B.F. Rich’s customer service department.

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Article source: http://windowanddoor.com/news-item/companies/b-f-rich-expands

Sound View Window & Door
2626 15th Ave W SeattleWA98119 USA 
 • 206-402-4229

AWP Invests in Manufacturing Processes

Written on October 21, 2014 at 11:34

AWP Windows and Doors announced that it implemented optimizer technology to significantly improve glass yields in the manufacturing process. “This represents a significant next step for AWP to capitalize on this half-million dollar investment to produce high quality products with even greater efficiency. These advances are part of a larger ongoing strategy to improve our manufacturing processes,” says Joseph Escribano, Managing Director of AWP.

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Article source: http://windowanddoor.com/news-item/companies/awp-invests-manufacturing-processes

Estimating the Unusual

Written on October 21, 2014 at 11:34

In my latest From the Field column, I discuss the challenge of consistently estimating replacement jobs for different home conditions.

The practice in our industry is to specify a base rate for a certain type of replacement (insert or full frame, for instance). This assumes reasonably accessible openings and sizes. Add-ons are then identified and bid by a qualified, experienced estimator.

The challenge these add-ons present is three-fold:
1) Identifying “out-of-the-ordinary” time-killers
2) Determining if, and how much, extra labor is justified
3) Identifying who handles the add-ons (it might not always be you).

Add-ons can vary. Perhaps security will need to be rewired or overgrown bushes trimmed back for access. The client may arrange the rewiring with their security company and/or may choose to trim back the hedges themselves beforehand. But based on my experience, removing and reinstalling plantation shutters is best handled by the installer.

A less experienced estimator can overlook some of these add-ons.

As an aid, you can use the pre-installation checklist available through Window Door. Its purpose is broader than just identifying add-ons; Sections 2 and 3 prompt some of the necessary discussion with the client. The list will demonstrate preparedness to your client and prevent unpleasant surprises. Wouldn’t you want to know in advance if a job is going to take longer so you can prepare a more accurate proposal?

I would love to hear your feedback on “estimating the unusual.” If you like the checklist, you can contact me for an editable version.

I’ll leave you with this poll question. Please select an answer, leave a comment, and/or write me at jim@windowjim.com.
 

Do your estimators have the experience to estimate any and all add-ons?

 

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Jim Snyder is an AAMA-certified FenestrationMaster and InstallationMaster who shares his years of installation field experience as an industry writer, speaker, trainer and project/product consultant for dealers and manufacturers. A member of various industry organizations, Snyder also is involved in instructional document creation and revision. Contact him at jim@windowjim.com.

Article source: http://windowanddoor.com/article/operations/estimating-unusual

Estimating Labor Costs When No Two Jobs Are Alike

Written on October 20, 2014 at 23:33

Experienced estimators can sometimes bid an entire home of turnkey replacement windows almost within minutes of meeting with a potential client. It’s merely a matter of multiplying the number of openings by a rounded per-unit figure and voila!—there’s your estimate. Though common, this standard “per-opening” installed bid only works up to a point. Even with the same (or similar-sized) product and a similar application, not everything is consistent from house to house.

The product cost of each opening might be precise, yet labor cost, if roughly based on the time it takes to complete a job, is variable. In certain circumstances, for example, it can take nearly twice the amount of time to complete the same procedure due to different existing conditions and all that comes with them. In theory, that could equate to more labor cost.

I realize that part of the installation trade is taking the more difficult jobs with the easier ones. You have to find some average costing or you’ll drive yourself crazy pricing every job. But are we sometimes absorbing too much extra labor?

The perspective of labor costs can be quite different, too, whether the installer is contracted versus employed by the dealer. Yet, even with contract labor, I’ve always stressed the importance of fair compensation for worthwhile installers—the value of that relationship with the dealer is priceless.

Granted, increasing the price and winning the contract is a careful balance. I’m sure we’ve all fought to win a particular job and later questioned our sacrificial labor bid. Thus, the question is: when do we simply have to charge more labor?

This is difficult to manage. Wouldn’t it be great if all replacement labor could be specified quickly and easily based on all variable home conditions? If only…

Flat Rate Comparisons
In the automotive industry, “flat rate” labor manuals are used. These disclose an industry standard time allotment (man hours) to perform a certain repair/replacement of a specific car’s specific component. The time allotment can be exact because every model is precisely the same. This figure is also tested and adjusted by actually timing experienced mechanics. For instance, say the job is to replace an alternator on a 2004 Toyota Corolla. The flat rate manual allows 1.4 hours. Vehicle specifics, such as “equipped with air conditioning” (which reduces accessibility), may also be added to accommodate for extra time in such vehicles. Regardless of how much time the mechanic takes to do the labor, over or under, the customer pays this standard. In this case, the estimate would account for 1.4 hours, plus any other specific accommodations, multiplied by the shop’s hourly rate. Because of this system, estimates can always be produced quickly and consistently, and there’s really no negotiating between the mechanic and the shop.

Can window replacement be similarly standardized? Published construction/remodel cost estimators are available. They are primarily based on tangible figures such as square footage of sheetrock or lineal footage of a wooden fence. Here, too, there are add-ons, but again, these are fairly specific and measurable. But, after digging through some of my remodeling estimators’ reference books, the closest thing I could find to window replacement was incomplete or too vague. Unlike the Corolla example where the car is brought to the mechanic in a well-equipped shop, a window that is replaced in the field can present a completely different access challenge every time.

Standard Practices
The consistent practice in our industry is to specify a base rate for a certain type of replacement (insert or full frame, for instance). This assumes reasonably accessible openings and sizes. Standardized add-ons are bid by the experience of a qualified estimator. These include second or third floor, wrapping exterior casing, and perhaps the more common interference issues such as plantation shutters. Beyond that, other issues that can hinder the ease and speed of window replacement can be difficult to standardize. In one example, my Chicago dealer friend told me that, due to parking restrictions, his company might have to tote a heavy window a few hundred yards, then up confining staircases just to get it to the opening. This dealer recognizes the significant extra time and manpower to justify extra billing. Unusual access, interference, height, product weight, and even travel distance from the truck to the opening are just a few considerations.

So, can installation labor be standardized?Only for the easy jobs. w
 

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Jim Snyder is an AAMA-certified FenestrationMaster and InstallationMaster who shares his years of installation field experience as an industry writer, speaker, trainer and project/product consultant for dealers and manufacturers. A member of various industry organizations, Snyder also is involved in instructional document creation and revision. Contact him at jim@windowjim.com.

Article source: http://windowanddoor.com/article/operations/estimating-labor-costs-when-no-two-jobs-are-alike

SafeGuard from Amesbury Truth

Written on October 20, 2014 at 23:33

Amesbury Truth Hardware’s new SafeGard window opening control device meets the requirements of ASTM F2090-10, the supplier reports. The reliable, easy-to-install and easy-to-operate device limits the window venting area to less than 4 inches when the window is initially opened. Users can then perform an additional operation without the use of keys, tools or special knowledge to fully open the window. SafeGard will automatically re-latch when the sash is fully closed. SafeGard is designed to allow for factory installation, as well as field application by trained personnel.

Article source: http://windowanddoor.com/product/door-window-hardware/safeguard-amesbury-truth

WTS Paradigm Helps a Local Family in Need

Written on October 16, 2014 at 11:29

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For the fifth year in a row, WTS Paradigm sponsored a local family through Habitat for Humanity of Dane County. WTS Paradigm employees volunteered their time to help build a home for the Parks family.

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WTS Paradigm donated all the windows, doors, and garage door for the Parks family. The windows used were Encompass by Pella, created by Pella Corp., one of WTS Paradigm’s partners. Volunteers from WTS Paradigm put up insulation and house wrap, as well as installed the windows and the patio door.

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Article source: http://windowanddoor.com/news-item/companies/wts-paradigm-helps-local-family-need

ProVia Streamlines its Product Configurator

Written on October 16, 2014 at 11:29

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ProVia announced that the company’s entryLINK product configurator has been completely revamped to centralize and streamline product design selection and order entry for its dealers. The goal for the new system is to streamline the process of viewing products and making design choices, while integrating selections with order entry. This is said to make ordering easier and error-free.

The new entryLINK is fully optimized for mobile devices such as Apple iPads and Android tablets. When signing in from a mobile device, entryLINK automatically optimizes for that dealer’s particular platform. entryLINK can also be used on PC or Macintosh desktop computers and laptops.

 

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Article source: http://windowanddoor.com/news-item/companies/provia-streamlines-its-product-configurator

Colorado Sunroom & Window Receives Top Honors

Written on October 15, 2014 at 11:27

The award-winning design and construction teams at Colorado Sunroom Window Distributors have been recognized by their peers again this year at the Colorado Awards for Remodeling Excellence. The company took top honors (first place) in three categories: Commercial Addition, Green Remodel, and Whole House Remodel.

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Article source: http://windowanddoor.com/news-item/colorado-sunroom-window-receives-top-honors

WDMA Report Breaks Down Entry Door Market

Written on October 15, 2014 at 11:27

Shipments of residential entry doors continue their upward trend, with the majority slotted for new construction applications, reports the Window Door Manufacturers Association in its WDMA Entry Door Industry 2014 U.S. Market Report. The number of residential exterior doors shipped in 2013, including side-hinged entry, sliding patio and hinged patio doors, grew 6 percent last year and is projected to increase another 5 percent in 2014. New construction projects remain the dominant application for entry doors, accounting for 65 percent of the market in 2013. Replacement projects had the second largest share at 22 percent, followed by remodeling projects at 13 percent, the association reports.

The complete WDMA Windows and Entry Door 2014 U.S. Market Study is available for purchase online in the WDMA Bookstore. The report delivers timely, detailed information on residential entry door, and residential and light commercial window market trends and product relationships; historic data for 2011 and 2012, and forecast data for 2014 through 2016. Forecasts are based on projections of construction activity as of May 2014. Also included in the report is data on Energy Star 2013 production and market growth.

 

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Article source: http://windowanddoor.com/news-item/markets/wdma-report-breaks-down-entry-door-market

Air Barrier Discussions at AAMA Western Region Meeting

Written on October 15, 2014 at 11:27

The first day of the Western Region meeting for the American Architectural Manufacturers Association began with discussion of air barriers from Laverne Dalgleish, executive director for the Air Barrier Association of America. “There are two key problem areas for air barriers: the roof/wall interface and the fenestration interface,” Dalgleish said.

Leaks in air barriers present a major issue for energy performance in both residential and commercial buildings. “Forty percent of U.S. primary energy use goes into buildings—22 percent goes into residential buildings,” Dalgleish said. “Three quads of energy are lost each year because of the air barrier.”

ABAA has worked to bring air barrier performance requirements into the codes, and to establish certification and accreditation programs for contractors, installers and labs. Dalgleish said ABAA is interested in a collaborative strategic partnership with AAMA to help address air barrier concerns at the fenestration interface.

The AAMA Western Region meeting runs Oct. 13-14 in Costa Mesa, California. Day two of the meeting includes presentations on zero net energy goals, California’s Title 24 and high-performance schools.

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Article source: http://windowanddoor.com/news-item/meetings-events/air-barrier-discussions-aama-western-region-meeting

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